Menu

Javascript is not activated in your browser. This website needs javascript activated to work properly.
You are here

Testimonials about the course Rehabilitation in Hand Surgery

An open admission course from Lund University Commissioned Education

Pauline Chevre, course participant in the rehabilitation in hand surgery course at Lund University
Pauline Chèvre, Switzerland


Why did you decide to apply to the course Rehabilitation in Hand Surgery? What were the three most appealing things about it?

I decided to apply to the course in Rehabilitation in Hand Surgery because I wanted to improve my practice as an occupational therapist within this field.

I think the international concept is an immense advantage of the course. In the course we can also discover new lecturers and practices. Compared to Switzerland, the university level course offers other manners and approaches. Finally, I believe the course is going to bring me different possibilities and approaches to treating my patients.

Which have been the main learning outcomes for you so far? What do you expect to learn in the following three weeks?

The main learning outcome after this first week is my personal knowledge enhancement in hand anatomy in regards to dorsal apparatus.

In the following three weeks I hope to improve my knowledge in different domains (i.e. fractures, nerves, scars) and especially what to apply in therapies. I also would like to exchange knowledge and experiences with other participants, learn about their practices and discover new tips.

One does not often hear about the hand and its issues, why do you think that is? And why is the hand important to you and your work?

I think the hand has become 'the normality'. Humanity grew up and continues to improve every day thanks to the hand (first to pick some fruits, to hunt, then to build our houses, to write our ideas and create our inventions). When we are in good health, we do not realise the usefulness of the hand.

For me the hand is really important because it represents everyday life, la vie quotidienne if you wish: You use your hand to eat, to wash your body, to take care of your baby, to hug the important people in your life, to practice your job, to do your hobbies and so on. With an injured hand, you’re limited and that can impact your mood and your balance. So, it is not just a broken bone or just a scar, it concerns the patient’s whole life. And all patients are different. It is really exciting!

 

Sana Alkatheri, course participant in the Rehabilitation in Hand Surgery course
Sana Alkatheri, Saudi Arabia 


Why did you decide to apply to the course Rehabilitation in Hand Surgery?

Hand rehabilitation is not considered to be a strong area in Saudi Arabia and there are no expert hand therapists to exchange and develop knowledge with. Because of that, I started to look for courses in other parts of the world to improve my skills in hand rehabilitation and to become a certified hand therapist. One of the websites I used in my search was the International Federation of Societies for Hand Therapy.

I chose the course at Lund University because of three main reasons. Firstly, because of the good reputation and status of Lund University, as well as the University being recommended by the Ministry of Education in Saudi Arabia. Secondly, the 15 ECTS credits allow me to eventually peruse a Master’s degree.  Thirdly, the flexible time schedule was attractive: four physical meetings during one year, which allow me to study and work simultaneously.

Which have been the main learning outcomes for you so far? What do you expect to learn in the following three weeks?

During the first week I mainly learned how to better search in the right database, how to analyse and compare studies. I deepened my knowledge in hand assessment and documentation, as well as commenced to recognise the hands’ and shoulders’ functional anatomy and their epidemiology. Finally I learned how to implement outcome measurement in the clinic, as well as hand terminology.

Through the next three weeks, I wish to characterise hand management, such as splinting, as well as other materials.

One does not often hear about the hand and its issues, why do you think that is? And why is the hand important to you and your work?

If someone does not hear about the hand and its issues there is lack of knowledge. This lack of knowledge could be due to difficulty to find reliable scientific resources, or difficulty for field experts to explain how important the hand actually is. For me, I am the only hand therapist in my geographical area, and I am facing difficulty to improve my skills and knowledge. In my department there are a high number of patients with hand and upper limb problems referred to the rehabilitation from orthopaedic surgeons, plastic surgeons, rheumatologists, neurologists and hand surgeons. They need hand therapists with specialised skills in assessment and treatment.

My plan is to eventually educate others and to start a hand therapy association in the Middle East.

 

Katrijn Strigl Rehabilitation in Hand Surgery course participant Lund University

Katrijn Strigl, Germany


Why did you decide to apply to the course Rehabilitation in Hand Surgery?

I have been an occupational therapist and hand therapist for many years now. Thanks to many good instructors, exchange with colleagues, and independent reading, I have gathered a backpack full of knowledge. This course gives me the possibility to review and refresh my knowledge and to complement it with information given by international experts in this specific field.

Another important aspect for me is the scientific approach the course offer. The combination of therapeutic and surgical information put into an evidence-based framework, supplemented with aspects of the ICF.

The course is also an excellent opportunity to exchange information, knowledge, tips and tricks for our clinical work in an interdisciplinary and international setting.

Which have been the main learning outcomes for you so far? What do you expect to learn in the following three weeks?

One of the outcomes was definitively that I now have a better comprehension of the biomechanics of the hand. It is not that difficult to learn the anatomic structures on your own, but you definitively need a specialist in biomechanics of the hand to get a "feeling" for it.

The course leader Birgitta Rosén told us that our profession has to both look at the "details and the whole". Listening to, and thinking about the explanations of Christina Jerosch-Hold in her presentation concerning outcomes, gave me more insight to reading the "details" in a scientific article as well as to the "whole" world of databases. The process of finding the article I want now seems much more structured to me and I think I will be able to improve my critical approach to reading an article more than I did before attending course week one.

In the following weeks I hope to be able to adjust the quality of my therapeutic sessions, to find enough arguments for treatment concepts and to study the interdisciplinary work in my department in Germany.

Besides gathering up-to-date information, I'm also looking forward to deepening the international contacts that I have made during the first week.

One does not often hear about the hand and its issues, why do you think that is? And why is the hand important to you and your work?

Comparing with other body parts, I think the hand still captures a small part within the medical world. Even if many hand surgeons think of themselves in terms of being a "hand-team" (a team of specialised surgeons, occupational and physical therapist who are specialised in hand treatments) there are still many surgeons and patients who do not know that “hand specialists” exist. I am convinced that if we keep working on a high quality level we will finally manage to convince all the partners that we need to work together as a hand-specialised-team to get the best results for our patients.

To me, the hand is more than just a tool we use. The more I hear and read about the evolution of the hand – the things our hand can express and do, the increasing knowledge about the interaction between the hand and the brain – the more it fascinates me. This fascination happened gradually: my interest in the hand changed slowly from a "this is my work" to a "the hand means much more than just work to me, it has become a hobby". The appeal for some of the capacities of the hand is wonderfully described in a poem by Harry Martinson, a poem I found when I read Prof. Göran Lundborg's book The Hand and the Brain.

Page Manager:

Contact information

Lund University Commissioned Education

Visiting address:
Stora Algatan 4, Lund

+46 (0)46 222 0707 (tel)
+46 (0)46 222 0750 (fax)

info [at] education.lu.se